Deep Imaging

Deep Imaging
Deep imaging to unravel the circuits underlying social preference

Social preference circuits drive individuals toward conspecifics and are vital for developing normal social behaviour. These circuits are too deep to image with standard microscopy, and thus we will use adaptive optics to image neural activity during behaviour.

When juvenile zebrafish first develop social behavior, the major brain area involved in social preference (the hypothalamus) is located > 750 microns below the surface and is thus difficult to image with conventional microscopy. In this project, we will implement a new method for imaging deep tissue that uses adaptive optics and wavefront shaping (developed in the Judkewitz Lab). This imaging method will then be used to monitor the activation of hypothalamic circuits while restrained zebrafish are engaged in a virtual social preference assay (developed in the Dreosti Lab).

Publications

  • Publication 1: Dreosti E, Lopes G, Kampff AR, Wilson SW. [2015] Development of social behavior in young zebrafish. Front Neural Circuits. Aug 18;9:39.

  • Publication 2: Papadopoulos IN, Jouhanneau JS, Poulet JF, Judkewitz B#, [2017] Scattering compensation by focus scanning holographic aberration probing (F-SHARP), Nature Photonics.

  • Publication 3: Lopes G, Bonacchi N, Frazão J, Neto JP, Atallah BV, Soares S, Moreira L, Matias S, Itskov PM, Correia PA, Medina RE, Calcaterra L, Dreosti E, Paton JJ, Kampff AR. [2015] Bonsai: an event-based framework for processing and controlling data streams. Apr 8;9:7.